A Question About Election Fraud in Georgia

2016 Georgia Code

Title 21 – Elections
Chapter 2 – Elections and Primaries Generally
Article 15 – Miscellaneous Offenses
§ 21-2-604. Criminal solicitation to commit election fraud; penalties

Universal Citation: GA Code § 21-2-604 (2016)

(a) (1) A person commits the offense of criminal solicitation to commit election fraud in the first degree when, with intent that another person engage in conduct constituting a felony under this article, he or she solicits, requests, commands, importunes, or otherwise attempts to cause the other person to engage in such conduct.

(2) A person commits the offense of criminal solicitation to commit election fraud in the second degree when, with intent that another person engage in conduct constituting a misdemeanor under this article, he or she solicits, requests, commands, importunes, or otherwise attempts to cause the other person to engage in such conduct.

(b) (1) A person convicted of the offense of criminal solicitation to commit election fraud in the first degree shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than three years.

(2) A person convicted of the offense of criminal solicitation to commit election fraud in the second degree shall be punished as for a misdemeanor.

(c) It is no defense to a prosecution for criminal solicitation to commit election fraud that the person solicited could not be guilty of the crime solicited.

(d) The provisions of subsections (a) through (c) of this Code section are cumulative and shall not supersede any other penal law of this state.

Trump contacted virtually every Georgia State official who might remotely have had an effect on the final count and outcome of the presidential vote in that state.

This fact is an element of the case presented by the House Managers in their impeachment case against Trump.

The Fulton County District Attorney, Fani Willis was not among those that Trump contacted in his stentorian effort to change the election outcome in Georgia.

She wrote a letter explaining why her office is the only office of competent jurisdiction over what may become the criminal prosecution of Trump for soliciting election fraud in the state of Georgia.

So here’s the question:

Why didn’t Trump place a call to this key state official?

Here’s two hints:

The Attorney General of the state of New York is also a black woman.

For the purposes of this post, the names of the Georgia officials Trump contacted are irrelevant.

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